Still here!

So I’m pretty terrible when it comes to blogging on a consistent basis but I definitely still have been making! And lately, making lots more since my frisbee season just ended! But between the ultimate frisbee and the summer that is the absolutely lovely Seattle weather, I have little motivation to engage in screen time outside of my work hours. But let me try to pick this up…for yet another try.

My biggest FO this summer was the Girasole shawl (but made into a circular blanket size) that took me the majority of this summer to create. Now that it’s en route to its owner, I feel like it’ll be ok to share on the interwebs blogosphere.

I made this for my old roommate (I have SO much trouble calling her a friend because she’s so much more than just a friend to me) who I lived with while I studied abroad in Italy.  She got married this summer and unfortunately due to both financial and frisbee reasons, I was unable to attend. Instead I chose to make one of my best and most intensive knitting projects yet.

I’m normally a multi-project person. I usually am actively working on 3-4 projects at any one given time. With this project, however, any time spent knitting was spent on this project. Definitely a great exercise in self-discipline. It traveled with me from Seattle to Eugene by car, to Ohio and Denver for tournaments, and Los Angeles for a work/family visit and now over to Germany for final gifting; definitely one of the more well-traveled projects I’ve worked on as well. It was quite a haul as it grew as well.

I’d never done a knitted on border with these points, but I’d come to really enjoy the technique. The only headache was that it was indeed a very large knitting project by the time I got to that part. One flight I was working on it from San Francisco to Seattle after a tournament and I was so tired that I ended up just curling up in it and sleeping under it instead of working on the border.

Aside from the patience, the blocking was definitely one of the most challenging aspects, both considering floor space and trying to get it “just right.” I had to take out the pins each time I realized that the finished diameter needed to grow or shrink just a little bit more. Unfortunately it wasn’t just taking out the pins either; each point (I didn’t count how many but it was a lot) had a pin as you can see below. Finished diameter: approximately 75″

Still, despite the arduous blocking process, this is one of the most rewarding projects I’ve ever done.

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Still here!

FO: Clap-oktus

I wonder, how is it that I always seem to be knitting, yet I can always find holes in my garment collection for “things that I haven’t knit for myself for”? Such is the case for scarves/shawls that are nice accessories for “wear to work” items in my closet. I immediately fell in love with this pattern, Clap-oktus, when browsing ravelry one day and knew just the yarn in my stash for it as well! (Thank you stash gods for this cake of hand-dyed Knit Picks bare in fingering weight!)

I dyed this guy last year, some time (I thought I had blogged about it, but naturally it’s one of those pictures that never got blogged about) trying to make a variegated, cloud/sky-esque yarn. Needless to say, it could have used a little more dye.

Nevertheless, I realized that this pattern would be perfect for the yarn, yarn perfect for the pattern. It was nice and simple, with a combination of basic knits and purls and the division/construction using measured weights of half the yarn made it perfect for using up ever last inch! It was amazing how it transformed from pre to post-blocking; unfortunately I didn’t get any pre-blocked pictures but here it is during blocking:

It went from being compact and closed to doubling in size as well as becoming super ethereal and airy afterwards. 

I’ve used it dozens of times since finishing and I think I’ll even want to dye a yarn especially for this pattern! I loved the finished size and the way it hangs and the way it wears, and is just oh so lovely!

FO: Clap-oktus